The CEO of BT Global Services is excited by what EE could offer his customers, but doesn’t see any value in acquiring rivals in the enterprise space.

Much of the focus of BT’s proposed acquisition of EE, which is still awaiting formal regulatory approval, has understandably focused on the retail market. But speaking to European Communications, Luis Alvarez was keen to talk up the benefits of the deal for his enterprise customers.

“Any businesses that operates in the UK will be able to benefit from the largest 4G infrastructure in the UK,” he said.

“The acquisition affects not only UK customers but global ones too.”

Alvarez said the deal would provide economies of scale.

EE revealed last month that it has 8,710 business subscribers.

The CEO is also keen to “leverage the learnings” from EE to boost Global Services’ existing three managed mobile solutions.

Further, he said he is keen to learn from what EE was doing in the IoT/M2M space.

Last month, the mobile operator unveiled a host of new “connected” products and services for both the private and public sectors. 

This includes the Royal Mail Group, who became the first major customer to sign up for its new M2M/IoT platform.

Alvarez said: “[EE] will help to consolidate, even develop, solutions that we can take anywhere in the world.

“This is a major opportunity for us to integrate our mobile services and build new solutions.”

[Read more: Q&A: BT Global Services CEO]

However, amid rumours that Verizon could be about to offload its enterprise arm, Alvarez does anticipate Global Services looking for an EE of its own.

“We still have a great opportunity to develop our customer base and portfolio,” he said.

According to the CEO, his enterprise customers don’t expect Global Services to have “a deep local presence in every market”.

Alvarez said: “They understand we need to partner and work with other telcos… but they want us to manage the complexity.”

He added: “Any deal you do has to have a means to an end and the end is to provide a better customer service, drive down costs and be more competitive.

"Of course, if there are any that are extremely cheap, and really add value to our shareholders then we might consider it.”

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